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Ground Source Heat Pumps extract heat from the earth. Ground source heat pumps are usually placed in an outbuilding or utility area and are about the size of a fridge freezer


HOW DOES GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP WORK?

Ground Source Heat Pumps convert low grade heat (not very warm air) from a wide surface area into high grade heat (hot air) for a smaller space. Coils are installed horizontally in shallow trenches beneath the surface of the ground or vertically in deeper boreholes. Fluid circulating through the coils collects heat and then transfers it into the property. Systems typically provide heat for radiators, under-floor heating systems or domestic hot water.

HOW MUCH HEAT CAN I GENERATE?

In general they are around 400% efficient, producing 4kW of heat output for every 1kW of electricity used. This makes them ideal for newer properties and renovated homes that are insulated to high levels.

A well designed heat pump will provide for all your heating and hot water requirements year round. It is essential that a design survey is carried out on your building to establish the heating requirements of the building and therefore the size of heat pump required.

WHAT ARE THE FINANCIAL BENEFITS AND INCENTIVES?

As well as the savings on your annual energy bills, heat pump installations benefit from the Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI). This means that the government will pay you to generate your own heating and hot water over 7 years at your home and up to 20 years at your business subject to certain scheme requirements.

Ground Source Heat Pump
Due their high coefficient of performance ground source heat pumps produce more output than input and therefore are a popular choice for larger country homes with the ground space to take the coils and correct geology for bore holes.

Like most renewable energy systems, they are subject to only 5% VAT.


Ground Source
Ground Source Heat Pump
Ground Source Heat Pumps


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